Bloomsday

The Bloomsday Run in Spokane, WA was my third straight weekend racing on the roads and my first stop on the ultra-competitive Professional Road Racing Organization (PRRO) Circuit. While the race can boast to have one of the deepest professional fields in the World each year, the Bloomsday 12K–now in its 35th running– has also evolved into one of the largest timed road races in the country with over 50,000 participants.  Given Bloomsday’s level of competition, history and prolific status in the national running community, it’s easy to recognize that an event of this magnitude cannot be missed.

Aside from the challenges of competing against top international and American athletes, the undulating profile of this 7.46 mile course presents an increased level of difficulty. The flat start and early downhill ramp in the second mile sends overzealous competitors rushing headlong down Riverside Avenue. The series of sobering climbs that follow on Government Way quickly introduce the headstrong to preliminary fatigue. After the 4th mile, the grave reality of Doomsday Hill becomes imminent. Recognized as one of the most daunting climbs in road racing, Doomsday Hill is nearly three-quarters of a mile of a leg-numbing 6.5% climb. After 145 vertical feet, there is still 2 1/2 miles of race remaining. The elevation map closely resembles  an EKG:

This was my third consecutive year racing in Spokane, and I used my veteran instincts to remain conservative for the first few miles. The brisk morning called for gloves and my CEP Compression Socks to keep me running smooth. I stalked the lead pack as we descended towards Latah Creek, favoring gravity over my glycogen stores. I ran even with a few fellow Yanks, Mbarak Hussein and the aforementioned Christian Hesch. During the rolling climbs that followed, I pulled away from this group and comfortably used the inclines to push forward. By 3 miles the lead pack was becoming fragmented.

I continued to bridge the gap from myself to other athletes. Robert Letting of Kenya quickly floated backwards. For a short period, I worked with Justin Young on a flat stretch near Spokane Falls Community College to catch up to Mike Reneau (a friend and former teammate from Michigan) and Joe Gray. We crossed the T.J. Meenach Bridge as an American trio, primed for Doomsday Hill. I recalled my practice runs up Snow Bowl Road and in Jerome as I climbed, and keyed off of Joe’s Mountain Running prowess. I crested Pettit Drive feeling strong, hitting the watch at 5 miles (a 4:48 split).

I moved into the 5th U.S. spot near Broadway. Joe was tenaciously following as we passed a Team USA Minnesotan wearing a neon Brooks ID Elite Singlet. I put my head down and kept grinding in an effort to distance myself from both of them. It’s the best part about racing– when competitive instincts override the body’s level of fatigue and discomfort. Regardless of my finishing time or place, I chose to make it hurt. A sharp right-hand turn after the Courthouse signified a 220-yard downhill finishing straight onto the Monroe Street Bridge. A three-way sprint finish ensued with Samuel Kosgei of Uganda and Ireland’s Andrew Ledwith. I was unable to pull the two in, but put a significant time margin on my compatriots to secure my American position in 36:16. It was a strong improvement my past years’ performances at Bloomsday, although I still feel that I have a ways to go in mastering this tough course. After changing out of my racing gear, I sipped some Vita Coco and threw on my Garmin Forerunner 305 for an extended cool-down on the Sentential Trail.

I always have a great Bloomsday experience thanks largely to the efforts of a World Class race organization. Hats off to benevolent Race Director Don Kardong and the indefatigable Jon Neill for coordinating the Elite field. With an extremely hospitable support crew, I always look forward to my annual May trip to the Lilac City.  –JDE

Advertisements

2 responses to “Bloomsday

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s